Posted in 40th Anniversary, comics, Lynda Carter, Wonderween

WONDERWEEN: Our Top Five Spookiest Wonder Woman Episodes

What do you get when you cross the 40th anniversary of the Wonder Woman TV show…with Halloween? You get our top five spookiest episode list! Welcome to WONDERWEEN! Now you have something to watch while handing out candy to all the little Skrills in the neighborhood.

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Kicking off our list is “Seance of Terror” – which must refer to the possessed wig worn by Diana Prince when she went undercover – it seemed to have a life of its own – and it was pretty terrifying. The episode also stars Bobby Brady’s brother (Todd Lookinland) who can move objects with his mind and who takes psychic photographs of Lynda Carter. Good thing he stopped at three!

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70s’ comedy duo, Shields and Yarnell guest-star in this creepy-crawly tale about a scientist bent on preventing the manufacturing of deadly pesticide. Oh – and she can turn herself into “Formicida,” a superhuman who can communicate with ants. If seeing a bunch of crawling ants don’t make you squirm, Lorene Yarnell’s  wide-eyed, teeth-bearing, ant-communicating grimace definitely will.

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Film legend, John Carradine guest-stars as Harlow Gault, a billionaire who plans to cheat death by transplanting his brain into the body of a young virile athlete. The plot of “Gault’s Brain” is the stuff of pulp horror magazines, boasting a bloated, pulsating, one-eyed brain prop in a glass tank (sitting in a wheelchair). You’ll either find it outrageously campy…or quite disturbing.

* Marc Andreyko deftly delivers a sequel to this tale in the Wonder Woman ’77 comic book story, “The Revenge of Gault’s Brain.” Check it out!

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Few people have almost caught Diana Prince spinning into Wonder Woman. But Skip Keller spies the heavenly transformation in the part-one cliffhanger to the appropriately titled, “The Boy Who Knew Her Secret.” Plot twist: when an extraterrestrial makes Diana forget she’s Wonder Woman, not even Skip can convince her of the truth. Creep-out factor goes off the scale when somebody touches a tetrahedron!

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When an intergalactic band of thieves known as the Skrill invade Earth, Wonder Woman must stop them from harvesting human minds. She gets a little help from Andros, Jr. (the son of the alien adjudicator she met in 1942), and she battles the evil Sardor – who looks and sounds a lot like Darth Vader. Not surprising since “Mind Stealers from Outer Space” was the show’s big two-parter on a new network (CBS) several months after Star Wars hit cinemas.

Honorable mentions: “Diana’s Disappearing Act,” “Disco Devil,” and “The Starships Are Coming,” all of which contain some spooky genre tropes, but not enough to make the list. Do you agree with out list?  Did we miss any?

HAPPY WONDERWEEN!

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Posted in 40th Anniversary, 75th Anniversary, Comic-Con, comics, Lynda Carter

United Nations to Observe October 21 as Wonder Woman Day!

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“The United Nations observes designated days, weeks, years, and decades, each with a theme, or topic. By creating special observances, the United Nations promotes international awareness and action on these issues.  The majority of observances have been established by resolutions of the United Nations General Assembly, although some have been designated by UN specialized agencies.  The United Nations also observes anniversaries of key events in its history.” — United Nations website.

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The United Nations was officially formed on October 24, 1945. But just 4 years earlier, a certain star-spangled female protagonist emerged from the back pages of a male-dominated comic book, All Star Comics #8. It was October 25, 1941, and Wonder Woman was born. “As lovely as Aphrodite – as wise as Athena – with the speed of Mercury and the strength of Hercules,” she came into “a world torn by the hatreds and wars of men,” and would become the world’s greatest – and most famous – female superhero.  Described by her creator, psychologist William Moulton Marston, Wonder Woman was “psychological propaganda for the new type of woman, who should, I believe, rule the world.”

75 years later, she’ll at least get to rule the day – when the UN designates October 21 (the copyright date for All Star Comics #8) “Wonder Woman Day.” As reported by Ilyssa Panitz in a Closer Weekly interview with Lynda Carter, the ceremony will be held on Friday, October 21 in New York City (presumably at UN headquarters) and TV’s Wonder Woman will be there. Carter’s presence makes sense considering her series is also celebrating an anniversary this year – its 40th. But no further details have been reported about the event. The UN hasn’t released any press, nor has DC Comics. But with New York Comic Con underway, we might get more news between now and Sunday.

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Until then, here’s more Wonder Woman at the United Nations: